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In vivo quantification of 177Lu with planar whole-body and SPECT/CT gamma camera imaging

Overview of attention for article published in EJNMMI Physics, September 2015
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Title
In vivo quantification of 177Lu with planar whole-body and SPECT/CT gamma camera imaging
Published in
EJNMMI Physics, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40658-015-0123-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dale L. Bailey, Thomas M. Hennessy, Kathy P. Willowson, E. Courtney Henry, David L.H. Chan, Alireza Aslani, Paul J. Roach

Abstract

Advances in gamma camera technology and the emergence of a number of new theranostic radiopharmaceutical pairings have re-awakened interest in in vivo quantification with single-photon-emitting radionuclides. We have implemented and validated methodology to provide quantitative imaging of (177)Lu for 2D whole-body planar studies and for 3D tomographic imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. Whole-body planar scans were performed on subjects to whom a known amount of [(177)Lu]-DOTA-octreotate had been administered for therapy. The total radioactivity estimated from the images was compared with the known amount of the radionuclide therapy administered. In separate studies, venous blood samples were withdrawn from subjects after administration of [(177)Lu]-DOTA-octreotate while a SPECT acquisition was in progress and the concentration of the radionuclide in the venous blood sample compared with that estimated from large blood pool structures in the SPECT reconstruction. The total radioactivity contained within an internal SPECT calibration standard was also assessed. In the whole-body planar scans (n = 28), the estimated total body radioactivity was accurate to within +4.6 ± 5.9 % (range -17.1 to +11.2 %) of the correct value. In the SPECT reconstructions (n = 12), the radioactivity concentration in the cardiac blood pool was accurate to within -4.0 ± 7.8 % (range -16.1 to +7.5 %) of the true value and the internal standard measurements (n = 89) were within 2.0 ± 8.5 % (range -16.3 to +24.2 %) of the known amount of radioactivity contained. In our hands, state-of-the-art hybrid SPECT/CT gamma cameras were able to provide accurate estimates of in vivo radioactivity to better than, on average, ±10 % for use in biodistribution and radionuclide dosimetry calculations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 27%
Other 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 15 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Engineering 4 7%
Chemistry 4 7%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,741,999
of 6,417,267 outputs
Outputs from EJNMMI Physics
#16
of 25 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,205
of 201,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EJNMMI Physics
#1
of 1 outputs
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