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Neuroscience-related research in Ghana: a systematic evaluation of direction and capacity

Overview of attention for article published in Metabolic Brain Disease, September 2015
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1 tweeter

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7 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
Title
Neuroscience-related research in Ghana: a systematic evaluation of direction and capacity
Published in
Metabolic Brain Disease, September 2015
DOI 10.1007/s11011-015-9724-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel Quansah, Thomas K. Karikari

Abstract

Neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases account for considerable healthcare, economic and social burdens in Ghana. In order to effectively address these burdens, appropriately-trained scientists who conduct high-impact neuroscience research will be needed. Additionally, research directions should be aligned with national research priorities. However, to provide information about current neuroscience research productivity and direction, the existing capacity and focus need to be identified. This would allow opportunities for collaborative research and training to be properly explored and developmental interventions to be better targeted. In this study, we sought to evaluate the existing capacity and direction of neuroscience-related research in Ghana. To do this, we examined publications reporting research investigations authored by scientists affiliated with Ghanaian institutions in specific areas of neuroscience over the last two decades (1995-2015). 127 articles that met our inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated in terms of research foci, annual publication trends and author affiliations. The most actively-researched areas identified include neurocognitive impairments in non-nervous system disorders, depression and suicide, epilepsy and seizures, neurological impact of substance misuse, and neurological disorders. These studies were mostly hospital and community-based surveys. About 60 % of these articles were published in the last seven years, suggesting a recent increase in research productivity. However, data on experimental and clinical research outcomes were particularly lacking. We suggest that future investigations should focus on the following specific areas where information was lacking: large-scale disease epidemiology, effectiveness of diagnostic platforms and therapeutic treatments, and the genetic, genomic and molecular bases of diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sierra Leone 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Researcher 5 14%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 25%
Unspecified 8 22%
Psychology 6 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,714,922
of 12,338,816 outputs
Outputs from Metabolic Brain Disease
#305
of 558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,276
of 252,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Metabolic Brain Disease
#14
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,338,816 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 558 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,830 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.