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Is 14 the new 40: trends in gallstone disease and cholecystectomy in Australian children

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Surgery International, June 2018
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Is 14 the new 40: trends in gallstone disease and cholecystectomy in Australian children
Published in
Pediatric Surgery International, June 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00383-018-4300-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas Greer, Sean Heywood, David Croaker, Siva Gananadha

Abstract

Gallstone disease and cholecystectomy have been uncommon in paediatric patients and associated with haemolytic disease and prematurity. Many countries have observed an increase in the prevalence of paediatric gallstones and cholecystectomy with increasing childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to determine any trend in prevalence in Australian children and the role of obesity. Chart review was conducted for patients undergoing cholecystectomy under 18 in 25 years between 1992 and 2016. Patients were grouped based on year of operation into five groups of 5 years each. Patient demographics including age and gender were noted, as were weight, height, and percentiles. Also noted were comorbidities, indication for surgery, whether elective or emergent, and procedure performed. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression on R-Studio®. Seventy-nine patients were included, 9, 15, 18, 18, and 19 in Groups 1-5, respectively. A trend was noted of increasing frequency which did not reach statistical significance. Nineteen patients had alternative explanations for gallstone disease, decreasing over time, coefficient - 10.5. A trend was also noted of increasing proportion of patients in higher percentiles for weight, which was statistically significant for those above the 98th percentile. The changing profile of paediatric cholecystectomy is a little recognised aspect of the 'obesity epidemic'. This has implications when considering the impact of childhood overweight and obesity, and for clinicians involved in the diagnosis and management of these children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 30%
Student > Master 2 20%
Student > Postgraduate 2 20%
Researcher 1 10%
Unknown 2 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 60%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Unknown 3 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,020,789
of 13,316,854 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Surgery International
#250
of 742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,213
of 268,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Surgery International
#5
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,316,854 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 742 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,105 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.