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Admission vitamin D status is associated with discharge destination in critically ill surgical patients

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, September 2015
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Title
Admission vitamin D status is associated with discharge destination in critically ill surgical patients
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13613-015-0065-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karolina Brook, Carlos A. Camargo, Kenneth B. Christopher, Sadeq A. Quraishi

Abstract

Discharge destination after critical illness is increasingly recognized as a valuable patient-centered outcome. Recently, vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with important outcomes such as length of stay (LOS) and mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Our goal was to investigate whether vitamin D status on ICU admission is associated with discharge destination. We performed a retrospective analysis from an ongoing prospective cohort study of vitamin D status in critical illness. Patients were recruited from two surgical ICUs at a single teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. All patients had 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels measured within 24 h of ICU admission. Discharge destination was dichotomized as non-home or home. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOWESS) was used to graph the relationship between 25OHD levels and discharge destination. To investigate the association between 25OHD level and discharge destination, we performed logistic regression analyses, controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, socioeconomic status, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score, need for emergent vs. non-emergent surgery, vitamin D supplementation status, and hospital LOS. 300 patients comprised the analytic cohort. Mean 25OHD level was 19 (standard deviation 8) ng/mL and 41 % of patients had a non-home discharge destination. LOWESS analysis demonstrated a near-inverse linear relationship between vitamin D status and non-home discharge destination to 25OHD levels around 10 ng/mL, with rapid flattening of the curve between levels of 10 and 20 ng/mL. Overall, 25OHD level at the outset of critical illness was inversely associated with non-home discharge destination (adjusted OR, 0.88; 95 % CI 0.82-0.95). When vitamin D status was dichotomized, patients with 25OHD levels <20 ng/mL had an almost 3-fold risk of a non-home discharge destination (adjusted OR, 2.74; 95 % CI 1.23-6.14) compared to patients with 25OHD levels ≥20 ng/mL. Our results suggest that vitamin D status may be a modifiable risk factor for non-home discharge destination in surgical ICU patients. Future randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation in surgical ICU patients can improve clinical outcomes such as the successful rate of discharge to home after critical illness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Qatar 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Researcher 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Lecturer 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,962,548
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#510
of 698 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,825
of 248,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 698 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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