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Acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis of liver: Clinical profile and predictors of outcome

Overview of attention for article published in Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, July 2018
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Title
Acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis of liver: Clinical profile and predictors of outcome
Published in
Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s12664-018-0867-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shiran Shetty, Shankar Prasad Nagaraju, Srinivas Shenoy, Ravindra Prabhu Attur, Dharshan Rangaswamy, Indu R. Rao, Uday Venkat Mateti, Rajeevalochana Parthasarathy

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and is associated with poor survival. We studied the clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with cirrhosis of the liver with AKI. This retrospective cohort study examined patients at a tertiary care hospital. AKI staging was done based on the new 2015 Ascites Club Criteria. Patients were grouped into three types of AKI: pre-renal azotemia (PRA), hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), and acute tubular necrosis (ATN). Data of 123 patients with cirrhosis and AKI were analyzed. Most patients had AKI stage 3 (57.7%). ATN (42.3%) and HRS (43.9) were the predominant types of AKI followed by PRA (13.8%). The overall in-hospital mortality in our study was 44.7%. The mortality increased with increasing severity of AKI (p = 0.0001) and was the highest in AKI stage 3 (p = 0.001) and those who required hemodialysis (p = 0.001). There was a significant in-hospital mortality in patients with ATN and HRS in comparison to PRA (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the factors predicting in-hospital mortality were AKI stage 3, and oliguria (p = 0.0001). Acute kidney injury in cirrhosis of liver carries high in-hospital mortality. Pre-renal AKI has a better survival compared to ATN and HRS. The higher stage of AKI at presentation and the presence of oliguria are two important predictors of in-hospital mortality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 60%
Other 1 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 60%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2018.
All research outputs
#9,902,358
of 12,936,999 outputs
Outputs from Indian Journal of Gastroenterology
#93
of 185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,370
of 266,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Indian Journal of Gastroenterology
#6
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,936,999 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 185 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.