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The role of anterior insular cortex in social emotions

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Structure & Function, April 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 828)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
290 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
632 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
The role of anterior insular cortex in social emotions
Published in
Brain Structure & Function, April 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00429-010-0251-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claus Lamm, Tania Singer

Abstract

Functional neuroimaging investigations in the fields of social neuroscience and neuroeconomics indicate that the anterior insular cortex (AI) is consistently involved in empathy, compassion, and interpersonal phenomena such as fairness and cooperation. These findings suggest that AI plays an important role in social emotions, hereby defined as affective states that arise when we interact with other people and that depend on the social context. After we link the role of AI in social emotions to interoceptive awareness and the representation of current global emotional states, we will present a model suggesting that AI is not only involved in representing current states, but also in predicting emotional states relevant to the self and others. This model also proposes that AI enables us to learn about emotional states as well as about the uncertainty attached to events, and implies that AI plays a dominant role in decision making in complex and uncertain environments. Our review further highlights that dorsal and ventro-central, as well as anterior and posterior subdivisions of AI potentially subserve different functions and guide different aspects of behavioral regulation. We conclude with a section summarizing different routes to understanding other people's actions, feelings and thoughts, emphasizing the notion that the predominant role of AI involves understanding others' feeling and bodily states rather than their action intentions or abstract beliefs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 632 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 20 3%
Germany 9 1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Italy 5 <1%
France 4 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Czechia 2 <1%
Other 17 3%
Unknown 559 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 198 31%
Researcher 117 19%
Student > Master 73 12%
Student > Bachelor 54 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 43 7%
Other 147 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 284 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 77 12%
Neuroscience 72 11%
Unspecified 67 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 64 10%
Other 68 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2017.
All research outputs
#296,885
of 11,411,580 outputs
Outputs from Brain Structure & Function
#19
of 828 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,876
of 103,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Structure & Function
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,411,580 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 828 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 103,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them