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Effects of two contrasted arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates on nutrient uptake by Sorghum bicolor under drought

Overview of attention for article published in Mycorrhiza, July 2018
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30 Mendeley
Title
Effects of two contrasted arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates on nutrient uptake by Sorghum bicolor under drought
Published in
Mycorrhiza, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00572-018-0853-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Symanczik, Moritz F. Lehmann, Andres Wiemken, Thomas Boller, Pierre-Emmanuel Courty

Abstract

Drought is a limiting factor for crop production, especially in arid and semi-arid climates. In this study, Sorghum bicolor plants were inoculated, or not, with Rhizophagus irregularis, an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) strain typical for temperate climates, or Rhizophagus arabicus, a strain endemic to hyper-arid ecosystems. Plants were grown under well-watered or drought conditions in compartmented microcosms. Transpiration rates, plant growth, and nutrient uptake (using 15N as a tracer) were determined to assess the impact of drought stress on sorghum plants in AM symbiosis. Although AM colonization did not affect the bulk biomass of host plants, R. arabicus improved their transpiration efficiency and drought tolerance more than R. irregularis. Moreover, R. arabicus was able to extract more 15N from the soil under both water regimes, and AM-driven enhancement of the nitrogen and phosphorus content of sorghum, especially when water was limiting, was greater for R. arabicus-inoculated plants than for R. irregularis-inoculated plants. Our work demonstrates close links between AM hyphal phosphorus and nitrogen transport and uptake by AM plants for both AM fungal species. It also underscores that, under the drought stress conditions we applied, R. arabicus transfers significantly more nitrogen to sorghum than R. irregularis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 53%
Unspecified 11 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,114,420
of 13,243,534 outputs
Outputs from Mycorrhiza
#268
of 445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,608
of 266,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mycorrhiza
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,243,534 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 445 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,507 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.