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Host plant iridoid glycosides mediate herbivore interactions with natural enemies

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, July 2018
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Title
Host plant iridoid glycosides mediate herbivore interactions with natural enemies
Published in
Oecologia, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00442-018-4224-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caitlin A. Kelly, M. Deane Bowers

Abstract

Many insect herbivores are dietary specialists capable of sequestering the secondary metabolites produced by their host plants. These defensive compounds have important but complex implications for tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. The sequestration of host plant secondary metabolites defends herbivores from attack by generalist predators, but may also compromise the immune response, making insect herbivores more vulnerable to parasitism. Here, we investigate the role of plant secondary metabolites in mediating interactions between a specialist herbivore and its natural enemies. The host plants are two Penstemon species, Penstemon glaber and Penstemon virgatus, which are chemically defended by iridoid glycosides (IGs). First, we examined how Penstemon iridoid glycoside content influences the sequestration of IGs by a specialist herbivore, Euphydryas anicia. Then, we performed ant bioassays to assess how host plant species influences larval susceptibility to predators and phenoloxidase assays to assess the immunocompetence and potential vulnerability to parasitoids and pathogens. We found that the concentration of IGs sequestered by E. anicia larvae varied with host plant diet. Larvae reared on P. glaber sequestered more IGs than larvae reared on P. virgatus. Yet, ant predators found larvae unpalatable regardless of host plant diet and were also repelled by sugar solutions containing isolated IGs. However, E. anicia larvae reared on P. glaber showed higher levels of phenoloxidase activity than larvae reared on P. virgatus. Our results suggest that the sequestration of some secondary metabolites can effectively protect herbivores from predation, yet may also increase vulnerability to parasitism via decreased immunocompetence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Unspecified 3 27%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Master 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 55%
Unspecified 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Environmental Science 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,386,901
of 13,387,275 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,110
of 2,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,839
of 266,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#38
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,387,275 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,866 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,199 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.