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Cord cross-sectional area at foramen magnum as a correlate of disability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in European Radiology Experimental, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
Title
Cord cross-sectional area at foramen magnum as a correlate of disability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Published in
European Radiology Experimental, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41747-018-0045-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niccolò Piaggio, Matteo Pardini, Luca Roccatagliata, Carlo Scialò, Corrado Cabona, Laura Bonzano, Matilde Inglese, Giovanni L. Mancardi, Claudia Caponnetto

Abstract

Spinal cord atrophy is one of the hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, it is not routinely assessed in routine clinical practice. In the present study, we evaluated whether spinal cord cross-sectional area measured at the foramen magnum level using a magnetic resonance imaging head scan represents a clinically meaningful measure to be added to the whole-brain volume assessment. Using an active surface approach, we measured the cord area at the foramen magnum and brain parenchymal fraction on T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled head scans in two groups of subjects: 23 patients with ALS (males/females, 13/10; mean ± standard deviation [SD] age 61.7 ± 10.3 years; median ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised score 39, range 27-46) and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (mean ± SD age 55.7 ± 10.2 years). Spinal cord area at the foramen magnum was significantly less in patients than in control subjects and was significantly correlated with disability as measured with the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ρ = 0.593, p <  0.005). This correlation remained significant after taking into account inter-individual differences in brain parenchymal fraction (ρ = 0.684, p <  0.001). Our data show that spinal cord area at the foramen magnum correlates with disability in ALS independently of whole-brain atrophy, thus indicating its potential as a disease biomarker.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Unknown 3 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%
Unknown 6 75%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,487,055
of 14,122,258 outputs
Outputs from European Radiology Experimental
#11
of 87 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,839
of 271,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Radiology Experimental
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,122,258 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 87 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them