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Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight men—a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Endocrine, July 2018
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
Title
Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight men—a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Endocrine, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s12020-018-1665-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christos Karefylakis, Stefan Särnblad, Annaclara Ariander, Gustaf Ehlersson, Eva Rask, Peter Rask

Abstract

Several observational studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and non-skeletal major health issues including impaired cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity. Only a few studies have examined the impact of vitamin D supplementation on these conditions and the results are ambiguous. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight/obese men with vitamin D deficiency. This study was a prospective, placebo controlled, double blinded, randomized trial with a study period of 6 months. Forty overweight/obese men (BMI > 25 kg/m2) with vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D ≤ 55 nmol/L) were randomized to receive either 2000 IU Cholecalciferol drops or the equivalent amount of drops of placebo. At baseline and follow up body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured and blood samples were obtained. Body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and cardiorespiratory fitness using cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). The primary outcomes were changes in percentage body fat and in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). No statistically significant difference between the placebo and the intervention group regarding changes in percentage body fat (p = 0.54) and VO2max (p = 0.90) was observed. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups concerning changes in BMI (p = 0.26), maximum load (p = 0.89) and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold (AT) (p = 0.14). We conclude that treatment with 2000 IU/d vitamin D for 6 months does not impact body composition or maximum oxygen uptake in overweight/obese men with vitamin D deficiency.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 22%
Other 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Professor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Psychology 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 8 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,950,698
of 13,827,708 outputs
Outputs from Endocrine
#423
of 1,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,001
of 271,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Endocrine
#11
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,827,708 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,002 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.