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A surgical strategy for lower grade gliomas using intraoperative molecular diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Tumor Pathology, July 2018
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2 tweeters

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5 Mendeley
Title
A surgical strategy for lower grade gliomas using intraoperative molecular diagnosis
Published in
Brain Tumor Pathology, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10014-018-0324-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shunichi Koriyama, Masayuki Nitta, Tatsuya Kobayashi, Yoshihiro Muragaki, Akane Suzuki, Takashi Maruyama, Takashi Komori, Kenta Masui, Taiichi Saito, Takayuki Yasuda, Junji Hosono, Saori Okamoto, Takahiro Shioyama, Hiroaki Yamatani, Takakazu Kawamata

Abstract

Lower grade gliomas are both treated and diagnosed via surgical resection. Maximum tumor resection is currently the standard of care; however, this risks the loss of brain function. Glioma can be genetically subdivided into three different types, based on isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status and the presence of 1p/19q codeletion, which have radically different prognoses and responses to adjuvant therapies. Therefore, the means to identify the subtype and evaluate the surrounding tissues during surgery would be advantageous. In this study, we have developed a new surgical strategy for lower grade glioma based on the fourth edition of the World Health Organization Brain Tumor Classification, involving intraoperative molecular diagnosis. High-resolution melting analysis was used to evaluate IDH mutational status, while rapid immunohistochemistry of p53 and alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) was used to evaluate the 1p/19q codeletion status, allowing genetic classification during surgery. In addition, intraoperative flow cytometry was used to evaluate the surgical cavity for additional tumor lesions, allowing maximal resection while mitigating the risk of functional losses. This strategy allows the rapid intraoperative diagnosis and mapping of lower grade gliomas, and its clinical use could dramatically improve its prognosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 40%
Student > Master 1 20%
Student > Postgraduate 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Neuroscience 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,511,847
of 13,194,193 outputs
Outputs from Brain Tumor Pathology
#53
of 108 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,511
of 267,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Tumor Pathology
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,194,193 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 108 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.