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Endothelial Dysfunction and Amyloid-β-Induced Neurovascular Alterations

Overview of attention for article published in Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology, September 2015
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Title
Endothelial Dysfunction and Amyloid-β-Induced Neurovascular Alterations
Published in
Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology, September 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10571-015-0256-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenzo Koizumi, Gang Wang, Laibaik Park

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular diseases share common vascular risk factors that have disastrous effects on cerebrovascular regulation. Endothelial cells, lining inner walls of cerebral blood vessels, form a dynamic interface between the blood and the brain and are critical for the maintenance of neurovascular homeostasis. Accordingly, injury in endothelial cells is regarded as one of the earliest symptoms of impaired vasoregulatory mechanisms. Extracellular buildup of amyloid-β (Aβ) is a central pathogenic factor in AD. Aβ exerts potent detrimental effects on cerebral blood vessels and impairs endothelial structure and function. Recent evidence implicates vascular oxidative stress and activation of the non-selective cationic channel transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)-2 on endothelial cells in the mechanisms of Aβ-induced neurovascular dysfunction. Thus, Aβ triggers opening of TRPM2 channels in endothelial cells leading to intracellular Ca(2+) overload and vasomotor dysfunction. The cerebrovascular dysfunction may contribute to AD pathogenesis by reducing the cerebral blood supply, leading to increased susceptibility to vascular insufficiency, and by promoting Aβ accumulation. The recent realization that vascular factors contribute to AD pathobiology suggests new targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 28 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 30%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 20%
Unspecified 4 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Other 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,851,068
of 12,333,288 outputs
Outputs from Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology
#372
of 556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,724
of 245,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology
#15
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,333,288 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 556 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.