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Polymorphism of bovine beta-casein and its potential effect on human health

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Genetics, September 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 216)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
patent
26 patents
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
91 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
205 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Polymorphism of bovine beta-casein and its potential effect on human health
Published in
Journal of Applied Genetics, September 2007
DOI 10.1007/bf03195213
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stanisław Kamiński, Anna Cieślińska, Elżbieta Kostyra

Abstract

Proteins in bovine milk are a common source of bioactive peptides. The peptides are released by the digestion of caseins and whey proteins. In vitro the bioactive peptide beta-casomorphin 7 (BCM-7) is yielded by the successive gastrointestinal proteolytic digestion of bovine beta-casein variants A1 and B, but this was not seen in variant A2. In hydrolysed milk with variant A1 of beta-casein, BCM-7 level is 4-fold higher than in A2 milk. Variants A1 and A2 of beta-casein are common among many dairy cattle breeds. A1 is the most frequent in Holstein-Friesian (0.310-0.660), Ayrshire (0.432-0.720) and Red (0.710) cattle. In contrast, a high frequency of A2 is observed in Guernsey (0.880-0.970) and Jersey (0.490-0.721) cattle. BCM-7 may play a role in the aetiology of human diseases. Epidemiological evidence from New Zealand claims that consumption of beta-casein A1 is associated with higher national mortality rates from ischaemic heart disease. It seems that the populations that consume milk containing high levels of beta-casein A2 have a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes. BCM-7 has also been suggested as a possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, neurological disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, seem to be associated with milk consumption and a higher level of BCM-7. Therefore, careful attention should be paid to that protein polymorphism, and deeper research is needed to verify the range and nature of its interactions with the human gastrointestinal tract and whole organism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 205 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Brazil 3 1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Palestine, State of 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 191 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 16%
Student > Master 32 16%
Student > Bachelor 22 11%
Other 16 8%
Other 63 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 12%
Unspecified 22 11%
Chemistry 13 6%
Other 39 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#546,006
of 13,040,046 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Genetics
#3
of 216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,741
of 108,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Genetics
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 216 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,386 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them