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The Use of Social Media by State Health Departments in the US: Analyzing Health Communication Through Facebook

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Community Health, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
Title
The Use of Social Media by State Health Departments in the US: Analyzing Health Communication Through Facebook
Published in
Journal of Community Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10900-015-0083-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayan Jha, Leesa Lin, Elena Savoia

Abstract

The use of social media as a powerful health communication tool is an area of current research interest. Our objective was to describe use of Facebook by State Health Departments (SHDs) in US, and their relationship with CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. Facebook pages of 34 SHDs were studied over a 200 day period, coding 2597 posts into 19 broad health communication categories. Mean number of Facebook posts per SHD was 76.4 (range 34-133); most frequent topic areas included healthy living (12 %), communicable diseases (9 %), vaccines and immunization (7 %), emergency preparedness and response (7 %), infant and child health (5 %), smoking and tobacco use (5 %), and miscellaneous (32 %). Through web-based interactive graphics (Google motion charts), we contrasted Facebook posts with CDC's BRFSS data on adult nutrition and physical activity, vaccination, smoking, adolescent health and road traffic accidents. Our research finds an apparent disconnect between content provided on Facebook by SHDs and the health conditions that affect their populations. Acknowledging the severe limitations in funding and human resources faced by the SHDs, our research attempts to present the factual situation in embracing a vastly popular social media platform for health communication. We believe there is a need for research exploring methods to balance the demands and resources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 2%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 90 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Researcher 9 10%
Unspecified 8 9%
Other 27 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 23 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 16%
Unspecified 15 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 14%
Psychology 10 11%
Other 17 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2019.
All research outputs
#883,972
of 13,568,805 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Community Health
#58
of 842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,701
of 238,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Community Health
#3
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,805 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.