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Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers as a representative ‘non-smoking-associated lung cancer’: epidemiology and clinical features

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Clinical Oncology, May 2011
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Title
Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers as a representative ‘non-smoking-associated lung cancer’: epidemiology and clinical features
Published in
International Journal of Clinical Oncology, May 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10147-010-0160-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tokujiro Yano, Akira Haro, Yasunori Shikada, Riichiroh Maruyama, Yoshihiko Maehara

Abstract

Recent interest in lung cancer without a history of tobacco smoking has led to the classification of a distinct disease entity of 'non-smoking-associated lung cancer'. In this review article, we have made an overview of the recent literature concerning both the epidemiology and clinical features of lung cancer in never smokers, and have brought 'non-smoking-associated lung cancer' into relief. The etiology of lung cancer in never smokers remains indefinite although many putative risk factors have been described including secondhand smoking, occupational exposures, pre-existing lung diseases, diet, estrogen exposure, etc. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in never smokers is clinically characterized by an increased incidence in females and a higher occurrence of adenocarcinoma in comparison to NSCLC in ever smokers in both surgical patients and non-resectable advanced-stage patients. Furthermore, the prognosis of never-smoking NSCLC is better than that of smoking-related NSCLC in both surgical patients and non-resectable advanced-stage patients. Recently recognized novel gene mutations such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) mutations are largely limited to never smokers or light smokers, and the expression of this gene is responsible for the clinical efficacy of gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. NSCLC with the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4)-ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) fusion gene is also more likely to occur in never smokers and in those with adenocarcinoma histology, and is expected to benefit from ALK inhibitors. In consideration of the future increase in never-smoking NSCLC or 'non-smoking-associated lung cancer', both clinical trials and investigations are needed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Master 7 11%
Unspecified 6 10%
Other 20 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 19%
Unspecified 11 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2011.
All research outputs
#7,638,453
of 12,223,436 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Clinical Oncology
#346
of 788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,260
of 104,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Clinical Oncology
#10
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,223,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 788 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.