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A new method for estimating patient body weight using CT dose modulation data

Overview of attention for article published in European Radiology Experimental, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
Title
A new method for estimating patient body weight using CT dose modulation data
Published in
European Radiology Experimental, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41747-017-0028-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominic Gascho, Lucia Ganzoni, Philippe Kolly, Niklaus Zoelch, Gary M. Hatch, Michael J. Thali, Thomas D. Ruder

Abstract

Body weight (BW) is a relevant metric in emergency care. However, visual/physical methods to estimate BW are unreliable. We have developed a method for estimating BW based on effective mAs (mAseff) from computed tomography (CT) dose modulation. The mAseff of CT examinations was correlated with the BW of 329 decedents. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate an equation for BW estimation based on the results of decedents with a postmortem interval (PMI) < 4 days (n = 240). The equation was applied to a validation group of 125 decedents. Pearson correlation and t-test statistics were used. We found an overall strong correlation between mAseff and BW (r = 0.931); r values ranged from 0.854 for decedents with PMI ≥ 4 days to 0.966 for those with PMI < 4 days; among the latter group, r was 0.974 for females and 0.960 for males and 0.969 in the presence and 0.966 in the absence of metallic implants (all correlations with p values < 0.001). The estimated BW was equal to 3.732 + (0.422 × mAseff) - (3.108 × sex index), where the sex index is 0 for males and 1 for females. The validation group showed a strong correlation (r = 0.969) between measured BW and the predicted BW, without significant differences overall (p = 0.119) as well as in female (p = 0.394) and in male decedents (p = 0.196). No outliers were observed. CT dose modulation is a rapid and reliable method for BW estimation with potential use in clinical practice, in particular in emergency settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Lecturer 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 6 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,896,622
of 13,153,703 outputs
Outputs from European Radiology Experimental
#16
of 57 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,194
of 268,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Radiology Experimental
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,153,703 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 57 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them