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Does intrinsic reward motivate cognitive control? a naturalistic-fMRI study based on the synchronization theory of flow

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
Title
Does intrinsic reward motivate cognitive control? a naturalistic-fMRI study based on the synchronization theory of flow
Published in
Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, June 2018
DOI 10.3758/s13415-018-0612-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard Huskey, Britney Craighead, Michael B. Miller, René Weber

Abstract

Cognitive control is a framework for understanding the neuropsychological processes that underlie the successful completion of everyday tasks. Only recently has research in this area investigated motivational contributions to control allocation. An important gap in our understanding is the way in which intrinsic rewards associated with a task motivate the sustained allocation of control. To address this issue, we draw on flow theory, which predicts that a balance between task difficulty and individual ability results in the highest levels of intrinsic reward. In three behavioral and one functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, we used a naturalistic and open-source video game stimulus to show that changes in the balance between task difficulty and an individual's ability to perform the task resulted in different levels of intrinsic reward, which is associated with different brain states. Specifically, psychophysiological interaction analyses show that high levels of intrinsic reward associated with a balance between task difficulty and individual ability are associated with increased functional connectivity between key structures within cognitive control and reward networks. By comparison, a mismatch between task difficulty and individual ability is associated with lower levels of intrinsic reward and corresponds to increased activity within the default mode network. These results suggest that intrinsic reward motivates cognitive control allocation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 30%
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Unspecified 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 21%
Psychology 10 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Unspecified 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,291,986
of 13,751,259 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#70
of 713 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,698
of 268,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#5
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,751,259 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 713 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,613 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.