↓ Skip to main content

Propagation Curve and Velocity of Swallowing Pressure in Healthy Young Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Dysphagia (0179051X), August 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Propagation Curve and Velocity of Swallowing Pressure in Healthy Young Adults
Published in
Dysphagia (0179051X), August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00455-015-9643-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keigo Matsubara, Yoshihiko Kumai, Yasuhiro Samejima, Eiji Yumoto

Abstract

The objective of this study is to construct a propagation curve and determine propagation velocities in young healthy adults examined using a 2.64-mm-diameter high-resolution manometry catheter with 36 circumferential sensors; to explore data reproducibility; and to determine whether the swallowing pressure (SP) propagation velocity correlated with bolus volume. Repeated measures with subjects serving as their own controls. Thirty healthy subjects (average age 25.3 years) swallowed saliva and 2, 5, and 10 mL of cold water to determine the maximum SP from the soft palate to the cervical esophagus. The SP propagation curve was obtained by plotting the duration to reach each SP peak. The SP propagation velocity was calculated for each region. These parameters were examined according to bolus size and gender. The intra-class correlation coefficient for estimating the SP propagation curves was >0.61 (i.e., highly consistent). The propagation velocity was maximal at the meso-hypopharynx and minimal at the UES and cervical esophagus. The SP propagation curve was very reproducible within any subject. Neither the water volume (with the exception of 2 and 5 mL) nor gender exerted any apparent effect on velocity in any region. However, the velocity was quite variable at the cervical esophagus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Researcher 1 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Linguistics 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2015.
All research outputs
#10,841,484
of 12,230,159 outputs
Outputs from Dysphagia (0179051X)
#690
of 746 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,073
of 236,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Dysphagia (0179051X)
#14
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,159 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 746 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.