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Phase II trial of sunitinib as adjuvant therapy after stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with 1–3 newly diagnosed brain metastases

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuro-Oncology, August 2015
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Title
Phase II trial of sunitinib as adjuvant therapy after stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with 1–3 newly diagnosed brain metastases
Published in
Journal of Neuro-Oncology, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s11060-015-1862-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manmeet S. Ahluwalia, Samuel T. Chao, Michael W. Parsons, John H. Suh, Ding Wang, Tom Mikkelsen, Cathy J. Brewer, Kathy N. Smolenski, Cathy Schilero, Matthew Rump, Paul Elson, Lilyana Angelov, Gene H. Barnett, Michael A. Vogelbaum, Robert J. Weil, David M. Peereboom

Abstract

Patients with 1-3 brain metastases (BM) often receive sterotactic radiosurgery (SRS) without whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). SRS without WBRT carries a high rate of relapse in the central nervous system (CNS). This trial used sunitinib as an alternative to WBRT for post-SRS adjuvant therapy. Eligible patients with 1-3 newly diagnosed BM, RTOG RPA class 1-2, received sunitinib after SRS. Patients with controlled systemic disease were allowed to continue chemotherapy for their primary disease according to a list of published regimens (therapy + sunitinib) included in the protocol. Patients received sunitinib 37.5 or 50 mg/days 1-28 every 42 days until CNS progression. Neuropsychological testing and MRIs were obtained every two cycles. The primary endpoint was the rate of CNS progression at 6 months (PFS6) after SRS. Fourteen patients with a median age of 59 years were enrolled. Primary cancers included lung 43 %, breast 21 %, melanoma 14 %. Toxicity included grade 3 or higher fatigue in five patients and neutropenia in two patients. The CNS PFS6 and PFS12 were 43 ± 14 and 34 ± 14 %, respectively. Of the ten patients who completed >1 neurocognitive assessment, none showed cognitive decline. Sunitinib after SRS for 1-3 BM was well tolerated with a PFS6 of 43 %. The prevention of progressive brain metastasis after SRS requires the incorporation of chemotherapy regimens to control the patient's primary disease. Future trials should continue to explore the paradigm of secondary chemoprevention of BM after definitive local therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Unspecified 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Neuroscience 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2015.
All research outputs
#9,836,886
of 12,317,289 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#1,124
of 1,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,151
of 241,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuro-Oncology
#48
of 111 outputs
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