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All eyes on the patient: the influence of oncologists’ nonverbal communication on breast cancer patients’ trust

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 3,285)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
All eyes on the patient: the influence of oncologists’ nonverbal communication on breast cancer patients’ trust
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10549-015-3486-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marij A. Hillen, Hanneke C. J. M. de Haes, Geertjan van Tienhoven, Nina Bijker, Hanneke W. M. van Laarhoven, Daniëlle M. Vermeulen, Ellen M. A. Smets

Abstract

Trust in the oncologist is crucial for breast cancer patients. It reduces worry, enhances decision making, and stimulates adherence. Optimal nonverbal communication by the oncologist, particularly eye contact, body posture, and smiling, presumably benefits patients' trust. We were the first to experimentally examine (1) how the oncologist's nonverbal behavior influences trust, and (2) individual differences in breast cancer patients' trust. Analogue patients (APs) viewed one out of eight versions of a video vignette displaying a consultation about chemotherapy treatment. All eight versions varied only in the oncologist's amount of eye contact (consistent vs. inconsistent), body posture (forward leaning vs. varying), and smiling (occasional smiling vs. no smiling). Primary outcome was trust in the observed oncologist (Trust in Oncologist Scale). 214 APs participated. Consistent eye contact led to stronger trust (β = -.13, p = .04). This effect was largely explained by lower educated patients, for whom the effect of consistent eye contact was stronger than for higher educated patients (β = .18, p = .01). A forward leaning body posture did not influence trust, nor did smiling. However, if the oncologist smiled more, he was perceived as more friendly (r s = .31, p < .001) and caring (r s = .18, p = .01). Older (β = .17, p = .01) and lower educated APs (β = -.25, p < .001) were more trusting. Trust was weaker for more avoidantly attached APs (β = -.16, p = .03). We experimentally demonstrated the importance of maintaining consistent eye contact for breast cancer patients' trust, especially among lower educated patients. These findings need to be translated into training for oncologists in how to optimize their nonverbal communication with breast cancer patients while simultaneously managing increased time pressure and computer use during the consultation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 23%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 19 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 30%
Psychology 10 18%
Unspecified 8 14%
Computer Science 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2018.
All research outputs
#348,467
of 13,498,419 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#47
of 3,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,795
of 234,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#1
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,498,419 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,170 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.