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Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals that S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) and nitric oxide signaling enhance poplar defense against chilling stress

Overview of attention for article published in Planta, August 2015
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2 tweeters

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19 Mendeley
Title
Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals that S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) and nitric oxide signaling enhance poplar defense against chilling stress
Published in
Planta, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00425-015-2374-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tielong Cheng, Jinhui Chen, Abd_Allah EF, Pengkai Wang, Guangping Wang, Xiangyang Hu, Jisen Shi

Abstract

NO acts as the essential signal to enhance poplar tolerance to chilling stress via antioxidant enzyme activities and protein S -nitrosylation modification, NO signal is also strictly controlled by S -nitrosoglutathione reductase and nitrate reductase to avoid the over-accumulation of reactive nitrogen species. Poplar (Populus trichocarpa) are fast growing woody plants with both ecological and economic value; however, the mechanisms by which poplar adapts to environmental stress are poorly understood. In this study, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification proteomic approach to characterize the response of poplar exposed to cold stress. We identified 114 proteins that were differentially expressed in plants exposed to cold stress. In particular, some of the proteins are involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) metabolism. Further physiological analysis showed that nitric oxide (NO) signaling activated a series of downstream defense responses. We further demonstrated that NO activated antioxidant enzyme activities and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activities, which would reduce ROS and RNS toxicity and thereby enhance poplar tolerance to cold stress. Suppressing NO accumulation or GSNOR activity aggravated cold damage to poplar leaves. Moreover, our results showed that RNS can suppress the activities of GSNOR and NO nitrate reductase (NR) by S-nitrosylation to fine-tune the NO signal and modulate ROS levels by modulating the S-nitrosylation of ascorbate peroxidase protein. Hence, our data demonstrate that NO signaling activates multiple pathways that enhance poplar tolerances to cold stress, and that NO signaling is strictly controlled through protein post-translational modification by S-nitrosylation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 47%
Unspecified 3 16%
Other 3 16%
Researcher 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 53%
Unspecified 3 16%
Chemistry 3 16%
Environmental Science 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,376,943
of 12,221,136 outputs
Outputs from Planta
#1,351
of 1,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,162
of 238,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Planta
#20
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.