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Further support for the alignment of cattle along magnetic field lines: reply to Hert et al.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 954)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Further support for the alignment of cattle along magnetic field lines: reply to Hert et al.
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, October 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00359-011-0674-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Begall, H. Burda, J. Červený, O. Gerter, J. Neef-Weisse, P. Němec

Abstract

Hert et al. (J Comp Physiol A, 2011) challenged one part of the study by Begall et al. (PNAS 105:13451-13455, 2008) claiming that they could not replicate the finding of preferential magnetic alignment of cattle recorded in aerial images of Google Earth. However, Hert and co-authors used a different statistical approach and applied the statistics on a sample partly unsuitable to examine magnetic alignment. About 50% of their data represent noise (resolution of the images is too poor to enable unambiguous measurement of the direction of body axes, pastures are on slopes, near settlements or high voltage power-lines, etc.). Moreover, the authors have selected for their analysis only ~ 40% of cattle that were present on the pastures analyzed. Here, we reanalyze all usable data and show that cattle significantly align their body axes in North-South direction on pastures analyzed by Hert and co-authors. This finding thus supports our previous study. In addition, we show by using aerial Google Earth images with good resolution, that the magnetic alignment is more pronounced in resting than in standing cattle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Austria 1 3%
Unknown 29 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 9 26%
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Unspecified 4 12%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 65%
Unspecified 3 9%
Physics and Astronomy 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#438,897
of 11,710,267 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#25
of 954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,964
of 101,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,710,267 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 954 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,177 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.