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Quality of transition to end-of-life care for cancer patients in the intensive care unit

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Quality of transition to end-of-life care for cancer patients in the intensive care unit
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13613-015-0059-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie J Miller, Nishita Desai, Natalie Pattison, Joanne M Droney, Angela King, Paul Farquhar-Smith, Pascale C Gruber

Abstract

There have been few studies that have evaluated the quality of end-of-life care (EOLC) for cancer patients in the ICU. The aim of this study was to explore the quality of transition to EOLC for cancer patients in ICU. The study was undertaken on medical patients admitted to a specialist cancer hospital ICU over 6 months. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to explore quality of transition to EOLC using documentary evidence. Clinical parameters on ICU admission were reviewed to determine if they could be used to identify patients who were likely to transition to EOLC during their ICU stay. Of 85 patients, 44.7% transitioned to EOLC during their ICU stay. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the patients' records demonstrated that there was collaborative decision-making between teams, patients and families during transition to EOLC. However, 51.4 and 40.5% of patients were too unwell to discuss transition to EOLC and DNACPR respectively. In the EOLC cohort, 76.3% died in ICU, but preferred place of death known in only 10%. Age, APACHE II score, and organ support, but not cancer diagnosis, were identified as associated with transition to EOLC (p = 0.017, p < 0.0001 and p = 0.001). Advanced EOLC planning in patients with progressive disease prior to acute deterioration is warranted to enable patients' wishes to be fulfilled and ceiling of treatments agreed. Better documentation and development of validated tools to measure the quality EOLC transition on the ICU are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 16%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 16 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,328,374
of 16,657,433 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#352
of 753 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,144
of 237,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,657,433 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 753 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,275 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them