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Using Citizen Scientists to Gather, Analyze, and Disseminate Information About Neighborhood Features That Affect Active Living

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Immigrant & Minority Health, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
Title
Using Citizen Scientists to Gather, Analyze, and Disseminate Information About Neighborhood Features That Affect Active Living
Published in
Journal of Immigrant & Minority Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10903-015-0241-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra J. Winter, Lisa Goldman Rosas, Priscilla Padilla Romero, Jylana L. Sheats, Matthew P. Buman, Cathleen Baker, Abby C. King

Abstract

Many Latinos are insufficiently active, partly due to neighborhoods with little environmental support for physical activity. Multi-level approaches are needed to create health-promoting neighborhoods in disadvantaged communities. Participant "citizen scientists" were adolescent (n = 10, mean age = 12.8 ± 0.6 years) and older adult (n = 10, mean age = 71.3 ± 6.5 years), low income Latinos in North Fair Oaks, California. Citizen scientists conducted environmental assessments to document perceived barriers to active living using the Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool, which records GPS-tracked walking routes, photographs, audio narratives, and survey responses. Using a community-engaged approach, citizen scientists subsequently attended a community meeting to engage in advocacy training, review assessment data, prioritize issues to address and brainstorm potential solutions and partners. Citizen scientists each conducted a neighborhood environmental assessment and recorded 366 photographs and audio narratives. Adolescents (n = 4), older adults (n = 7) and community members (n = 4) collectively identified reducing trash and improving personal safety and sidewalk quality as the priority issues to address. Three adolescent and four older adult citizen scientists volunteered to present study findings to key stakeholders. This study demonstrated that with minimal training, low-income, Latino adolescent and older adult citizen scientists can: (1) use innovative technology to gather information about features of their neighborhood environment that influence active living, (2) analyze their information and identify potential solutions, and (3) engage with stakeholders to advocate for the development of healthier neighborhoods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 129 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 22%
Researcher 21 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 25 18%
Unknown 20 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 20 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Psychology 10 7%
Sports and Recreations 8 6%
Other 35 26%
Unknown 31 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,793,639
of 12,536,541 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Immigrant & Minority Health
#367
of 774 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,431
of 235,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Immigrant & Minority Health
#8
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,536,541 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 774 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.