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Clinical and imaging-based prognostic factors in radioembolisation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: a retrospective exploratory analysis

Overview of attention for article published in EJNMMI Research, May 2017
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49 Mendeley
Title
Clinical and imaging-based prognostic factors in radioembolisation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: a retrospective exploratory analysis
Published in
EJNMMI Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13550-017-0292-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathy P. Willowson, Aimee R. Hayes, David L. H. Chan, Michael Tapner, Elizabeth J. Bernard, Richard Maher, Nick Pavlakis, Stephen J. Clarke, Dale L. Bailey

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between absorbed dose and response of colorectal cancer liver metastases treated with [(90)Y]-resin microspheres and to explore possible clinical and imaging derived prognostic factors. FDG PET/CT was used to measure response of individual lesions to a measured absorbed dose, derived from post-treatment (90)Y PET imaging. Predicted dose was also derived from planning [(99m)Tc]-MAA SPECT data. Peak standardised uptake value and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were explored as response measures, and compared to dose metrics including average dose (D avg), biologically effective dose, minimum dose to 70% of lesion volume and volume receiving at least 50 Gy. Prognostic factors examined included baseline TLG, RAS mutation status, FDG heterogeneity and dose heterogeneity. In an exploratory analysis, response and clinico-pathological variables were evaluated and compared to overall survival. Sixty-three lesions were analysed from 22 patients. Poor agreement was seen between predicted and measured dose values. TLG was a superior measure of response, and all dose metrics were significant prognostic factors, with a D avg of ~50 Gy derived as the critical threshold for a significant response (>50% reduction in TLG). No significant correlation was found between baseline TLG or RAS mutation status and response. Measured dose heterogeneity was a significant prognostic factor and when combined with D avg had a positive predictive value for response >80%. In the exploratory analysis for prognostic factors of survival, low hepatic tumour burden and mean reduction in TLG >65% were independently associated with improved overall survival. Lesions receiving an average dose greater than 50 Gy are likely to have a significant response. For lesions receiving less than 50 Gy, dose heterogeneity is a significant prognostic factor. Lesions receiving an average dose less than 20 Gy are unlikely to respond. A reduction in TLG may be associated with improved overall survival.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 13 27%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 47%
Physics and Astronomy 8 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 14 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,162,756
of 13,017,042 outputs
Outputs from EJNMMI Research
#102
of 255 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,015
of 271,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EJNMMI Research
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,017,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 255 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,669 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.