↓ Skip to main content

Orthognathic surgery and temporomandibular joint symptoms

Overview of attention for article published in Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, May 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
Title
Orthognathic surgery and temporomandibular joint symptoms
Published in
Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40902-015-0014-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hwi-Dong Jung, Sang Yoon Kim, Hyung-Sik Park, Young-Soo Jung

Abstract

The aim of this article is to review temporomandibular joint symptoms as well as the effects of orthognathic surgery(OGS) on temporomandibular joint(TMJ). The causes of temporomandibular joint disease(TMD) are multifactorial, and the symptoms of TMD manifest as a limited range of motion of mandible, pain in masticatory muscles and TMJ, Joint noise (clicking, popping, or crepitus), myofascial pain, and other functional limitations. Treatment must be started based on the proper diagnosis, and almost symptoms could be subsided by reversible options. Minimally invasive options and open arthroplasty are also available following reversible treatment when indicated. TMD manifesting in a variety of symptoms, also can apply abnormal stress to mandibular condyles and affect its growth pattern of mandible. Thus, adaptive developmental changes on mandibular condyles and post-developmental degenerative changes of mandibular condyles can create alteration on facial skeleton and occlusion. The changes of facial skeleton in DFD patients following OGS have an impact on TMJ, masticatory musculature, and surrounding soft tissues, and the changes of TMJ symptoms. Maxillofacial surgeons must remind that any surgical procedures involving mandibular osteotomy can directly affect TMJ symptoms, thus pre-existing TMJ symptoms and diagnoses should be considered prior to treatment planning and OGS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 131 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 17%
Student > Postgraduate 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 8%
Other 21 16%
Unknown 30 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 69 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Sports and Recreations 3 2%
Unspecified 2 2%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 45 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2020.
All research outputs
#4,133,781
of 22,817,213 outputs
Outputs from Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
#2
of 69 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,640
of 266,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,817,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,608 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them