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Cannabinoids and Tremor Induced by Motor-related Disorders: Friend or Foe?

Overview of attention for article published in Neurotherapeutics, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
Title
Cannabinoids and Tremor Induced by Motor-related Disorders: Friend or Foe?
Published in
Neurotherapeutics, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s13311-015-0367-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shokouh Arjmand, Zohreh Vaziri, Mina Behzadi, Hassan Abbassian, Gary J. Stephens, Mohammad Shabani

Abstract

Tremor arises from an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction/relaxation cycle and is a common disabling symptom of many motor-related diseases such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington disease, and forms of ataxia. In the wake of anecdotal, largely uncontrolled, observations claiming the amelioration of some symptoms among cannabis smokers, and the high density of cannabinoid receptors in the areas responsible for motor function, including basal ganglia and cerebellum, many researchers have pursued the question of whether cannabinoid-based compounds could be used therapeutically to alleviate tremor associated with central nervous system diseases. In this review, we focus on possible effects of cannabinoid-based medicines, in particular on Parkinsonian and multiple sclerosis-related tremors and the common probable molecular mechanisms. While, at present, inconclusive results have been obtained, future investigations should extend preclinical studies with different cannabinoids to controlled clinical trials to determine potential benefits in tremor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Unknown 92 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 16 17%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Student > Master 12 13%
Other 12 13%
Researcher 11 12%
Other 28 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 22%
Unspecified 21 22%
Neuroscience 15 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 14%
Psychology 7 7%
Other 17 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2016.
All research outputs
#7,054,448
of 13,041,449 outputs
Outputs from Neurotherapeutics
#351
of 574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,485
of 231,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurotherapeutics
#14
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,041,449 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.