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Behavioral Activation and Inhibition, Negative Affect, and Gambling Severity in a Sample of Young Adult College Students

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Gambling Studies, September 2011
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1 tweeter

Citations

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68 Mendeley
Title
Behavioral Activation and Inhibition, Negative Affect, and Gambling Severity in a Sample of Young Adult College Students
Published in
Journal of Gambling Studies, September 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10899-011-9273-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Atkinson, Carla Sharp, Joy Schmitz, Ilya Yaroslavsky

Abstract

The prevalence of pathological gambling among college students is increasing. Few studies have directly examined the relation between reward processing and gambling severity while concurrently examining the effects of co-occurring negative affect in this at risk population. This study used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques to analyze results from an online survey of 352 female and 96 male students age 18-25. Participants completed measures of past year gambling behavior and severity of gambling problems using the Canadian Problem Gambling Index and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Negative affect and reward processing were measured by the 21-item version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and the Behavioral Inhibition System and Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales, respectively. Thirty-five percent of participants reported gambling in the previous 12 months, and 11% had gambling severity scores indicative of "moderate-risk" or "problem gambling." Gambling severity was associated with negative affect. Negative affect, in turn, was correlated with the unitary BIS scale and inversely associated with the BAS reward responsiveness scale. Reward responsiveness was also inversely associated with gambling severity. In the SEM models, the association between reward responsiveness and gambling severity was mediated by negative affect among males but not among females. Potential explanations for these findings and their implications for addressing problem gambling are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 66 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Unspecified 6 9%
Other 20 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 54%
Unspecified 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Neuroscience 4 6%
Other 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2011.
All research outputs
#7,716,363
of 12,341,652 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Gambling Studies
#385
of 559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,879
of 101,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Gambling Studies
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,341,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 559 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,358 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.