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Health-related quality of life in a sample of Australian adolescents: gender and age comparison

Overview of attention for article published in Quality of Life Research, June 2015
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
Title
Health-related quality of life in a sample of Australian adolescents: gender and age comparison
Published in
Quality of Life Research, June 2015
DOI 10.1007/s11136-015-1033-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tanya Meade, Elizabeth Dowswell

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to profile the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a sample of secondary school-aged children in Australia. The secondary purpose was to contribute to the international literature on the HRQoL of adolescents using the KIDSCREEN instrument. The KIDSCREEN-27 Questionnaire was completed by 1111 adolescents aged between 11 and 17 from six Australian secondary schools. MANCOVA analysis was employed to examine age and gender differences. Over 70 % of participants reported high levels of HRQoL across all five dimensions. Age patterns were identified with younger adolescents reporting greater HRQoL than older adolescents. Similarly, gender differences were noted with male adolescents reporting higher scores than female adolescents on three out of five dimensions of HRQoL. This is the first study to measure HRQoL in Australian adolescents using the KIDSCREEN instrument. Consistent with previous research, gender and age differences were found across most dimensions of HRQoL. These results highlight the importance of comprehensively measuring the HRQoL in adolescents to capture developmental shifts and to inform preventative and supportive programs as needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Unspecified 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 9 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 28%
Unspecified 5 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Other 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2015.
All research outputs
#9,858,214
of 12,342,011 outputs
Outputs from Quality of Life Research
#1,195
of 1,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,501
of 238,969 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Quality of Life Research
#57
of 88 outputs
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