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Ketamine-Induced Toxicity in Neurons Differentiated from Neural Stem Cells

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurobiology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

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Citations

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17 Dimensions

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21 Mendeley
Title
Ketamine-Induced Toxicity in Neurons Differentiated from Neural Stem Cells
Published in
Molecular Neurobiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12035-015-9248-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

William Slikker, Fang Liu, Shuo W. Rainosek, Tucker A. Patterson, Natalya Sadovova, Joseph P. Hanig, Merle G. Paule, Cheng Wang

Abstract

Ketamine is used as a general anesthetic, and recent data suggest that anesthetics can cause neuronal damage when exposure occurs during development. The precise mechanisms are not completely understood. To evaluate the degree of ketamine-induced neuronal toxicity, neural stem cells were isolated from gestational day 16 rat fetuses. On the eighth day in culture, proliferating neural stem cells were exposed for 24 h to ketamine at 1, 10, 100, and 500 μM. To determine the effect of ketamine on differentiated stem cells, separate cultures of neural stem cells were maintained in transition medium (DIV 6) for 1 day and kept in differentiation medium for another 3 days. Differentiated neural cells were exposed for 24 h to 10 μM ketamine. Markers of cellular proliferation and differentiation, mitochondrial health, cell death/damage, and oxidative damage were monitored to determine: (1) the effects of ketamine on neural stem cell proliferation and neural stem cell differentiation; (2) the nature and degree of ketamine-induced toxicity in proliferating neural stem cells and differentiated neural cells; and (3) to provide information regarding receptor expression and possible mechanisms underlying ketamine toxicity. After ketamine exposure at a clinically relevant concentration (10 μM), neural stem cell proliferation was not significantly affected and oxidative DNA damage was not induced. No significant effect on mitochondrial viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay) in neural stem cell cultures (growth medium) was observed at ketamine concentrations up to 500 μM. However, quantitative analysis shows that the number of differentiated neurons was substantially reduced in 10 μM ketamine-exposed cultures in differentiation medium, compared with the controls. No significant changes in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes and O4-positive oligodendrocytes (in differentiation medium) were detected from ketamine-exposed cultures. The discussion focuses on: (1) the doses and time-course over which ketamine is associated with damage of neural cells; (2) how ketamine directs or signals neural stem cells/neural cells to undergo apoptosis or necrosis; (3) how functional neuronal transmitter receptors affect neurotoxicity induced by ketamine; and (4) advantages of using neural stem cell models to study critical issues related to ketamine anesthesia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 24%
Unspecified 4 19%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 33%
Neuroscience 5 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,910,624
of 13,029,364 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurobiology
#873
of 2,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,227
of 233,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurobiology
#19
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,029,364 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,145 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.