↓ Skip to main content

The role of medial prefrontal cortex in processing emotional self-referential information: a combined TMS/fMRI study

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Imaging and Behavior, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
Title
The role of medial prefrontal cortex in processing emotional self-referential information: a combined TMS/fMRI study
Published in
Brain Imaging and Behavior, May 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11682-018-9867-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola De Pisapia, Guido Barchiesi, Jorge Jovicich, Luigi Cattaneo

Abstract

In this study we investigate the neural basis of emotional content in self-referential processing by using a combination of off-line repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) applied to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and whole-brain functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI).We applied effective or ineffective (sham) 1-Hz rTMS to the mPFC of 14 healthy participants who immediately thereafter underwent fMRI while performing a personality attribution task to self or to others. rTMS produced an increase in the participants' reaction time (≈ 60 msec) when processing negative attributes. The neuroimaging findings indicated the involvement of a network of cortical nodes distant from those at the stimulation site; these distant nodes showed task-specific changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity after effective TMS. The posterior cingulate cortex seemingly encoded the negative dimension of stimuli, but it did not differentiate between self or other. On the contrary the left angular gyrus and the left anterior temporal cortex showed changes indicating encoding of negative self-directed categorization. The mPFC region did not show effects of rTMS along the self-other dimension, but only along the affective dimension. The results indicate that the mPFC is a pivotal node in a cortical network that supports affective referential reasoning. Therefore, a key function of mPFC seems to be related to the processing of negative attributes. In the other nodes of the network the two dimensions of self-other attribution and affective attribution are partially independent, but largely overlapping with different degrees of local specialization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 34%
Psychology 12 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,105,731
of 12,923,750 outputs
Outputs from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#426
of 745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,717
of 269,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#36
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,923,750 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,951 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.