↓ Skip to main content

Long-term survival and quality of life after intensive care for patients 80 years of age or older

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Long-term survival and quality of life after intensive care for patients 80 years of age or older
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13613-015-0053-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Finn H Andersen, Hans Flaatten, Pål Klepstad, Ulla Romild, Reidar Kvåle

Abstract

Comparison of survival and quality of life in a mixed ICU population of patients 80 years of age or older with a matched segment of the general population. We retrospectively analyzed survival of ICU patients ≥80 years admitted to the Haukeland University Hospital in 2000-2012. We prospectively used the EuroQol-5D to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between survivors at follow-up and an age- and gender-matched general population. Follow-up was 1-13.8 years. The included 395 patients (mean age 83.8 years, 61.0 % males) showed an overall survival of 75.9 (ICU), 59.5 (hospital), and 42.0 % 1 year after the ICU. High ICU mortality was predicted by age, mechanical ventilator support, SAPS II, maximum SOFA, and multitrauma with head injury. High hospital mortality was predicted by an unplanned surgical admission. One-year mortality was predicted by respiratory failure and isolated head injury. We found no differences in HRQOL at follow-up between survivors (n = 58) and control subjects (n = 179) or between admission categories. Of the ICU non-survivors, 63.2 % died within 2 days after ICU admission (n = 60), and 68.3 % of these had life-sustaining treatment (LST) limitations. LST limitations were applied for 71.3 % (n = 114) of the hospital non-survivors (ICU 70.5 % (n = 67); post-ICU 72.3 % (n = 47)). Overall 1-year survival was 42.0 %. Survival rates beyond that were comparable to those of the general octogenarian population. Among survivors at follow-up, HRQOL was comparable to that of the age- and sex-matched general population. Patients admitted for planned surgery had better short- and long-term survival rates than those admitted for medical reasons or unplanned surgery for 3 years after ICU admittance. The majority of the ICU non-survivors died within 2 days, and most of these had LST limitation decisions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 68 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 9 13%
Student > Master 9 13%
Other 6 8%
Other 17 24%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 61%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2020.
All research outputs
#10,447,164
of 17,773,620 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#548
of 823 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,663
of 243,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,773,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 823 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them