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Herbivores with similar feeding modes interact through the induction of different plant responses

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Herbivores with similar feeding modes interact through the induction of different plant responses
Published in
Oecologia, May 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00442-015-3344-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisa F. de Oliveira, Angelo Pallini, Arne Janssen

Abstract

Plants respond to attacks by herbivores with various defences, which are mounted through the activation of different biochemical pathways that are known to interact. Thus, the attack of a plant by one herbivore species may result in changes in the performances of other species on the same plant. It has been suggested that species with comparable feeding modes induce similar plant defences and such herbivores are therefore expected to have a negative effect on each other's performance. We studied two closely related phytophagous mite species with identical feeding modes. Yet, one of the species (Tetranychus urticae) induces tomato plant defences, whereas the other (T. evansi) reduces them. We found that the "inducing" species benefits from the downregulation of defences by the "reducing" species, which, in turn, suffers from the induction of defences by the inducing species. Moreover, the performances of the two mite species on leaves that were previously attacked by both species simultaneously were intermediate between that on leaves previously attacked by each of the mites separately. The activity of proteinase inhibitor, a defensive compound, was not found to be intermediate in leaves attacked by both species simultaneously-it was almost as high as the activity seen in leaves with defences induced by T. urticae. Oviposition rates of T. urticae showed a nonlinear correlation with inhibitor activity, suggesting that it is potentially problematic to use this activity as an indicator of the level of plant defence. Our results show that herbivores with similar feeding modes have opposite effects on plant defence and differentially affect each other's performance on co-infested plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Slovenia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 42 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 25%
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Master 8 17%
Unspecified 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 81%
Unspecified 5 10%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Engineering 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,683,442
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#1,763
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,259
of 233,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#25
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.