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Lon in maintaining mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Toxicology, May 2018
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Title
Lon in maintaining mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis
Published in
Archives of Toxicology, May 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00204-018-2210-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jieyeqi Yang, Wenying Chen, Boyang Zhang, Fengli Tian, Zheng Zhou, Xin Liao, Chen Li, Yi Zhang, Yanyan Han, Yan Wang, Yuzhe Li, Guo-Qing Wang, Xiao Li Shen

Abstract

As a vital member of AAA+ (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) protein superfamily, Lon, a homo-hexameric ring-shaped protein complex with a serine-lysine catalytic dyad, is highly conserved throughout almost all prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lon protease (LONP) plays an important role in maintaining mitoproteostasis through selectively recognizing and degrading oxidatively modified mitoproteins within mitochondrial matrix, such as oxidized aconitase, phosphorylated mitochondrial transcription factor A, etc. Furthermore, the up-regulated LONP increased mitochondrial ROS generation to promote cell survival, cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cell migration, which was attributed to the up-regulation of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase core subunit S8 via interaction with chaperone Lon under hypoxic or oxidative stress in tumorigenesis. In addition, Lon also participated in protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase signaling pathway under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In short, Lon, as a pivotal stress-responsive protein that involved in the crosstalks among mitochondria, ER and nucleus, participated in multifarious important cellular processes crucial for cell survival, such as the mitochondrial protein quality control system, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, the mtDNA maintenance, and the ER unfolded protein response.

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The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 33%
Student > Master 1 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2018.
All research outputs
#11,459,732
of 12,892,079 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Toxicology
#1,664
of 1,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,361
of 269,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Toxicology
#27
of 32 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,835 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.