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Cut-off values of myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT phase analysis parameters of normal subjects, and conduction and mechanical cardiac diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, May 2015
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Title
Cut-off values of myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT phase analysis parameters of normal subjects, and conduction and mechanical cardiac diseases
Published in
Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, May 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12350-015-0143-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guillermo Romero-Farina, Santiago Aguadé-Bruix, Jaume Candell-Riera, María N. Pizzi, David García-Dorado

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the cut-off values of gated myocardial perfusion rest SPECT phase analysis parameters of normal subjects, and conduction (CCD) and mechanical cardiac diseases (MCD). We prospectively analyzed 455 patients by means of phase analysis using SyncTool™ (Emory Cardiac Toolbox™). Of these, 150 corresponded to the control group (group 1, normal subjects) and 305 corresponded to patients with cardiac diseases (group 2, 63 with only CCD, 121 with only MCD, and 121 with CCD plus MCD). The optimal cut-off (CO) values of the peak phase (P), standard deviation (SD), bandwidth (B), skewness (S), and kurtosis (K) for discriminating between normal and dyssynchrony were obtained. In order to differentiate group 1 from group 2, CO of SD > 18.4 and CO of B > 51 were the most sensitive parameters (75.7%, 95% CI 70.5%-80.4%, and 78.7%, 95% CI 73.7%-83.1%, respectively), and CO of S ≤ 3.2 and CO of K ≤ 9.3 were the most specific (92%, 95% CI 86.4%-95.8%, and 94.7%, 95% CI 89.8%-97.7%, respectively). In order to differentiate patients with CCD and MCD, CO values were SD > 26.1, B > 70, S ≤ 2.89, and K ≤ 10.2. In order to differentiate between patients with (n: 26) and without (n: 216) criteria of cardiac resynchronization therapy, CO values were SD > 40.2, B > 132, S ≤ 2.3, and K ≤ 4.6. In this pilot study, different CO values of phase histogram parameters were observed between normal subjects and patients with conduction and MCD, and between patients with and without criteria of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 9 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 59%
Unspecified 5 23%
Computer Science 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,323,549
of 12,199,521 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
#566
of 1,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,064
of 232,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
#24
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,199,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,101 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,259 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.