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Psychiatric morbidity and subsequent divorce: a couple-level register-based study in Finland

Overview of attention for article published in Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, May 2018
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2 tweeters

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6 Mendeley
Title
Psychiatric morbidity and subsequent divorce: a couple-level register-based study in Finland
Published in
Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, May 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00127-018-1521-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niina Metsä-Simola, Pekka Martikainen, Christiaan W. Monden

Abstract

Studies that assess the role of mental health for the risk of divorce are scarce and mostly rely on individual-level data, although divorce is a couple-level phenomenon. Using data on couples, we examine the effects of both spouses' psychiatric morbidity on the risk of divorce, and whether socio-demographic factors affect these associations. We followed 96,222 Finnish married couples for 6 years using register-based data on both spouses and their household. New incidence of psychiatric morbidity and subsequent divorce was identified from dates of prescription medication purchases and hospital admissions, and dates of registered divorce. Socio-demographic factors were measured annually for both spouses and their household. The effect of incident psychiatric morbidity on divorce risk was analyzed using Cox regression. Psychiatric morbidity in men increased the age-adjusted risk of divorce more than twofold and in women nearly twofold. The risk of divorce was particularly pronounced immediately after new incidence of psychiatric morbidity, before settling to a persistently high level. Psychiatric morbidity in both spouses increased the risk of divorce almost threefold. Adjustment for socio-economic factors had little effect on these associations. Psychiatric morbidity is a persistent risk factor of divorce. The risk is larger when both spouses experience psychiatric morbidity compared to only one spouse. The findings are consistent with the idea that poor relationship quality and dissatisfaction in couples suffering from mental health problems have long-term consequences for marital stability. Treatment of psychiatric morbidity should not focus only on the individual but on couple-level dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 50%
Psychology 1 17%
Social Sciences 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,733,307
of 12,961,283 outputs
Outputs from Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology
#1,204
of 1,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,091
of 268,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology
#26
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,961,283 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,889 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.