↓ Skip to main content

A co-utilization strategy to consume glycerol and monosaccharides by Rhizopus strains for fumaric acid production

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
A co-utilization strategy to consume glycerol and monosaccharides by Rhizopus strains for fumaric acid production
Published in
AMB Express, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13568-018-0601-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sylwia Kowalczyk, Elwira Komoń-Janczara, Agnieszka Glibowska, Adam Kuzdraliński, Tomasz Czernecki, Zdzisław Targoński

Abstract

The ability of Rhizopus oryzae to produce fumaric acid in the presence of glycerol and/or various monosaccharides as carbon sources was examined for seventeen different strains of this fungi. These strains were tested in shake-flask cultures on media containing glycerol and seven different carbohydrates, including glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. An interesting and applicationally useful phenomenon was observed. This work presents a new approach to the conventional microbiological method of producing fumaric acid. In the presence of 40 g/l glycerol as the sole carbon source, fumaric acid production reached 0.16-6.1 g/l after 192 h. When monosaccharides were used as a single carbon source, the maximum fumaric acid concentration was much higher; for example, 19.8 g/l was achieved when 40 g/l xylose was used. In the co-fermentation of xylose (40 g/l) and glycerol (20 g/l), post-culture broth contained approx. 28.0 g/l of fumaric acid with a process yield of 0.90 g/g after 168 h. The production of fumaric acid by Rhizopus oryzae was also increased in the dual presence of glycerol and monosaccharides like fructose, galactose, and mannose. However, results obtained on glucose-glycerol-based medium did not follow this trend, showing instead complete utilization of glucose with significant glycerol consumption, but unexpectedly low final amounts of fumaric acid and process yields. Understanding how Rhizopus oryzae utilize various carbon sources may provide alternative avenues of fumaric acid fermentation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Professor 1 7%
Lecturer 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Unknown 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Chemical Engineering 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2018.
All research outputs
#11,451,420
of 12,881,446 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#743
of 813 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,458
of 269,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#29
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,881,446 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 813 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.