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Using Social Media for Social Comparison and Feedback-Seeking: Gender and Popularity Moderate Associations with Depressive Symptoms

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 1,539)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
446 Mendeley
Title
Using Social Media for Social Comparison and Feedback-Seeking: Gender and Popularity Moderate Associations with Depressive Symptoms
Published in
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10802-015-0020-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacqueline Nesi, Mitchell J. Prinstein

Abstract

This study examined specific technology-based behaviors (social comparison and interpersonal feedback-seeking) that may interact with offline individual characteristics to predict concurrent depressive symptoms among adolescents. A total of 619 students (57 % female; mean age 14.6) completed self-report questionnaires at 2 time points. Adolescents reported on levels of depressive symptoms at baseline, and 1 year later on depressive symptoms, frequency of technology use (cell phones, Facebook, and Instagram), excessive reassurance-seeking, and technology-based social comparison and feedback-seeking. Adolescents also completed sociometric nominations of popularity. Consistent with hypotheses, technology-based social comparison and feedback-seeking were associated with depressive symptoms. Popularity and gender served as moderators of this effect, such that the association was particularly strong among females and adolescents low in popularity. Associations were found above and beyond the effects of overall frequency of technology use, offline excessive reassurance-seeking, and prior depressive symptoms. Findings highlight the utility of examining the psychological implications of adolescents' technology use within the framework of existing interpersonal models of adolescent depression and suggest the importance of more nuanced approaches to the study of adolescents' media use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 446 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Unknown 436 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 103 23%
Student > Bachelor 101 23%
Student > Master 69 15%
Unspecified 57 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 6%
Other 88 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 188 42%
Unspecified 108 24%
Social Sciences 57 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 22 5%
Other 48 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 109. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2019.
All research outputs
#149,749
of 13,851,111 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#9
of 1,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,048
of 233,027 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#2
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,851,111 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,539 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,027 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.