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Therapeutic strategies for functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome based on pathophysiology

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Gastroenterology, April 2015
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62 Mendeley
Title
Therapeutic strategies for functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome based on pathophysiology
Published in
Journal of Gastroenterology, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00535-015-1076-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas J. Talley, Gerald Holtmann, Marjorie M. Walker

Abstract

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common and distressing. They are so named because a defined pathophysiology in terms of structural or biochemical pathways is lacking. Traditionally FGIDs have been conceptualized as brain-gut disorders, with subgroups of patients demonstrating visceral hypersensitivity and motility abnormalities as well as psychological distress. However, it is becoming apparent that there are certain structural or biochemical gut alterations among subsets with the common FGIDs, most notably functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). For example, a sodium channel mutation has been identified in IBS that may account for 2 % of cases, and subtle intestinal inflammation has been observed in both IBS and FD. Other research has implicated early life events and stress, autoimmune disorders and atopy and infections, the gut microbiome and disordered mucosal immune activation in patients with IBS or FD. Understanding the origin of symptoms in FGIDs will allow therapy to be targeted at the pathophysiological changes, not at merely alleviating symptoms, and holds hope for eventual cure in some cases. For example, there are promising developments in manipulating the microbiome through diet, prebiotics and antibiotics in IBS, and testing and treating patients for Helicobacter pylori infection remains a mainstay of therapy in patients with dyspepsia and this infection. Locally acting drugs such as linaclotide have been an advance in treating the symptoms of constipation-predominant IBS, but do not alter the natural history of the disease. A role for a holistic approach to patients with FGIDs is warranted, as brain-to-gut and gut-to-brain pathways appear to be activated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 26%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 20 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Unspecified 4 6%
Other 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#9,376,873
of 12,221,136 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Gastroenterology
#519
of 711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,996
of 230,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Gastroenterology
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 711 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.