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Informal Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Viral Load Suppression Among Current or Former Injection Drug Users Living with HIV/AIDS

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS & Behavior, May 2015
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1 tweeter

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30 Mendeley
Title
Informal Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Viral Load Suppression Among Current or Former Injection Drug Users Living with HIV/AIDS
Published in
AIDS & Behavior, May 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10461-015-1090-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mary M. Mitchell, Allysha C. Robinson, Trang Q. Nguyen, Amy R. Knowlton

Abstract

Few studies have examined the association between having an informal (unpaid) caregiver and viral suppression among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) who are on antiretroviral therapy. The current study examined relationships between caregivers' individual and social network characteristics and care recipient viral suppression. Baseline data were from the BEACON study caregivers and their HIV seropositive former or current drug using care recipients, of whom 89 % were African American (N = 258 dyads). Using adjusted logistic regression, care recipient's undetectable viral load was positively associated with caregiver's limited physical functioning and negatively associated with caregivers having few family members to turn to for problem solving, a greater number of current drug users in their network, and poorer perceptions of the care recipient's mental health. Results further understandings of interpersonal relationship factors important to PLHIV's health outcomes, and the need for caregiving relationship-focused intervention to promote viral suppression among PLHIV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 20%
Researcher 5 17%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 27%
Social Sciences 7 23%
Unspecified 6 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2015.
All research outputs
#9,839,813
of 12,321,014 outputs
Outputs from AIDS & Behavior
#1,974
of 2,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,884
of 236,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS & Behavior
#68
of 77 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 2,338 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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