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Weight Loss and the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Using Lifestyle Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Bariatric Surgery: Mechanisms of Action

Overview of attention for article published in Current Obesity Reports, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 244)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Weight Loss and the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Using Lifestyle Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Bariatric Surgery: Mechanisms of Action
Published in
Current Obesity Reports, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s13679-015-0155-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Grams, W. Timothy Garvey

Abstract

Weight loss, whether achieved by lifestyle intervention, pharmacotherapy, or bariatric surgery, is highly effective as a primary interventional strategy in both the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. In high-risk patients with prediabetes and/or metabolic syndrome, weight loss effectively prevents progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and improves cardiovascular risk factors. These benefits are the result of improvements in insulin resistance, which is central to the pathophysiology of cardiometabolic disease. In patients with T2DM, weight loss improves glycemia, while reducing the need for conventional glucose-lowering medicines, by affecting all three processes that produce and sustain the hyperglycemic state, namely via increments in peripheral insulin sensitivity with improvements in insulin signal transduction at the cellular level, more robust insulin secretory responses, and reduced rates of hepatic glucose production. In both nondiabetic and diabetic subjects, hypocaloric feeding (e.g., treatment with very low-calorie diet or bariatric surgery) produces a rapid improvement in insulin sensitivity due to mobilization of fat from the intramyocellular, intrahepatocellular, and intra-abdominal compartments, and via a more long-term mechanism that correlates with the loss of total body fat. In diabetes, by improving glycemia, weight loss also enhances glucose homeostasis by reversing the defects in insulin action and secretion attributable to glucose toxicity. Regardless of the therapeutic approach, weight loss of ∼10 % maximally prevents future diabetes in patients with prediabetes or metabolic syndrome. In T2DM, greater degrees of weight loss lead to progressive improvements in glucose homeostasis. Therefore, when accompanied by greater weight loss, the metabolic benefits following bariatric surgery are generally more pronounced than those achieved following lifestyle and medical treatment. In addition, the mechanisms by which bariatric operations improve diabetes may include both weight-dependent and weight-independent mechanisms, and the latter may involve changes in gut hormones, bile acids, or gut microflora.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 86 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 23%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Researcher 13 15%
Unspecified 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Other 19 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 36%
Unspecified 17 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 14 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2018.
All research outputs
#472,519
of 12,448,635 outputs
Outputs from Current Obesity Reports
#26
of 244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,124
of 223,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Obesity Reports
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,448,635 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 244 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.