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Food approach conditioning and discrimination learning using sound cues in benthic sharks

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 1,034)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
36 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
86 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
Title
Food approach conditioning and discrimination learning using sound cues in benthic sharks
Published in
Animal Cognition, April 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10071-018-1183-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catarina Vila Pouca, Culum Brown

Abstract

The marine environment is filled with biotic and abiotic sounds. Some of these sounds predict important events that influence fitness while others are unimportant. Individuals can learn specific sound cues and 'soundscapes' and use them for vital activities such as foraging, predator avoidance, communication and orientation. Most research with sounds in elasmobranchs has focused on hearing thresholds and attractiveness to sound sources, but very little is known about their abilities to learn about sounds, especially in benthic species. Here we investigated if juvenile Port Jackson sharks could learn to associate a musical stimulus with a food reward, discriminate between two distinct musical stimuli, and whether individual personality traits were linked to cognitive performance. Five out of eight sharks were successfully conditioned to associate a jazz song with a food reward delivered in a specific corner of the tank. We observed repeatable individual differences in activity and boldness in all eight sharks, but these personality traits were not linked to the learning performance assays we examined. These sharks were later trained in a discrimination task, where they had to distinguish between the same jazz and a novel classical music song, and swim to opposite corners of the tank according to the stimulus played. The sharks' performance to the jazz stimulus declined to chance levels in the discrimination task. Interestingly, some sharks developed a strong side bias to the right, which in some cases was not the correct side for the jazz stimulus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Researcher 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 35%
Environmental Science 3 10%
Psychology 3 10%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 385. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2019.
All research outputs
#30,136
of 14,187,944 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#13
of 1,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,464
of 275,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,187,944 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,034 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,129 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.