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Making the Connection: Using Videoconferencing to Increase Linkage to Care for Incarcerated Persons Living with HIV Post-release

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS & Behavior, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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25 Mendeley
Title
Making the Connection: Using Videoconferencing to Increase Linkage to Care for Incarcerated Persons Living with HIV Post-release
Published in
AIDS & Behavior, April 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10461-018-2115-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antoine D. Brantley, Karissa M. Page, Barry Zack, Kira Radtke Friedrich, Deborah Wendell, William T. Robinson, DeAnn Gruber

Abstract

Incarcerated persons living with HIV (PLWH) have relatively high levels of HIV care engagement and antiretroviral therapy adherence during incarceration, but few are able to maintain these levels upon reentry into the community. In Louisiana, PLWH nearing release from prisons were offered video conferences with case managers housed in community based organizations aimed at facilitating linkage to care in the community. Of the 144 persons who received a video conference during the study period, 74.3% had linked to HIV care in the community within 90 days after release. Compared to the comparison group (n = 94), no statistically significant difference in linkage rate was detected (p > 0.05). Nonetheless, the video conference supplement was positively received by clients and case management agencies in the community and the lack of a detectable impact may be due to early difficulties in intervention delivery and study design limitations. Further study is needed to determine the value of the video conferencing supplement in other settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 16%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Master 3 12%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Unknown 11 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,129,533
of 12,959,714 outputs
Outputs from AIDS & Behavior
#1,731
of 2,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,009
of 269,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS & Behavior
#66
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,959,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,456 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.