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Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Youth & Adolescence, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
9 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
Title
Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model
Published in
Journal of Youth & Adolescence, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10964-015-0266-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dian A. de Vries, Jochen Peter, Hanneke de Graaf, Peter Nikken

Abstract

Previous correlational research indicates that adolescent girls who use social network sites more frequently are more dissatisfied with their bodies. However, we know little about the causal direction of this relationship, the mechanisms underlying this relationship, and whether this relationship also occurs among boys to the same extent. The present two-wave panel study (18 month time lag) among 604 Dutch adolescents (aged 11-18; 50.7 % female; 97.7 % native Dutch) aimed to fill these gaps in knowledge. Structural equation modeling showed that social network site use predicted increased body dissatisfaction and increased peer influence on body image in the form of receiving peer appearance-related feedback. Peer appearance-related feedback did not predict body dissatisfaction and thus did not mediate the effect of social network site use on body dissatisfaction. Gender did not moderate the findings. Hence, social network sites can play an adverse role in the body image of both adolescent boys and girls.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Croatia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 226 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 69 30%
Student > Master 44 19%
Unspecified 31 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 42 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 110 47%
Social Sciences 37 16%
Unspecified 37 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 5%
Other 23 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2019.
All research outputs
#447,799
of 13,317,108 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#73
of 1,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,492
of 221,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Youth & Adolescence
#2
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,317,108 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,187 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.