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Alzheimer’s disease is not “brain aging”: neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica, April 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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151 Dimensions

Readers on

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155 Mendeley
Title
Alzheimer’s disease is not “brain aging”: neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica, April 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00401-011-0826-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter T. Nelson, Elizabeth Head, Frederick A. Schmitt, Paulina R. Davis, Janna H. Neltner, Gregory A. Jicha, Erin L. Abner, Charles D. Smith, Linda J. Van Eldik, Richard J. Kryscio, Stephen W. Scheff

Abstract

Human studies are reviewed concerning whether "aging"-related mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. AD is defined by specific neuropathology: neuritic amyloid plaques and neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. AD pathology is driven by genetic factors related not to aging per se, but instead to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In contrast to genes involved in APP-related mechanisms, there is no firm connection between genes implicated in human "accelerated aging" diseases (progerias) and AD. The epidemiology of AD in advanced age is highly relevant but deceptively challenging to address given the low autopsy rates in most countries. In extreme old age, brain diseases other than AD approximate AD prevalence while the impact of AD pathology appears to peak by age 95 and decline thereafter. Many distinct brain diseases other than AD afflict older human brains and contribute to cognitive impairment. Additional prevalent pathologies include cerebrovascular disease and hippocampal sclerosis, both high-morbidity brain diseases that appear to peak in incidence later than AD chronologically. Because of these common brain diseases of extreme old age, the epidemiology differs between clinical "dementia" and the subset of dementia cases with AD pathology. Additional aging-associated mechanisms for cognitive decline such as diabetes and synapse loss have been linked to AD and these hypotheses are discussed. Criteria are proposed to define an "aging-linked" disease, and AD fails all of these criteria. In conclusion, it may be most fruitful to focus attention on specific pathways involved in AD rather than attributing it to an inevitable consequence of aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 143 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 17%
Student > Bachelor 24 15%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Master 20 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 9%
Other 50 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 19%
Psychology 22 14%
Unspecified 19 12%
Neuroscience 19 12%
Other 19 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,408,865
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica
#325
of 1,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,627
of 96,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica
#2
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 96,483 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.