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Zebrafish vitamin K epoxide reductases: expression in vivo, along extracellular matrix mineralization and under phylloquinone and warfarin in vitro exposure

Overview of attention for article published in Fish Physiology and Biochemistry, March 2015
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Title
Zebrafish vitamin K epoxide reductases: expression in vivo, along extracellular matrix mineralization and under phylloquinone and warfarin in vitro exposure
Published in
Fish Physiology and Biochemistry, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10695-015-0043-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ignacio Fernández, Parameswaran Vijayakumar, Carlos Marques, M. Leonor Cancela, Paulo J. Gavaia, Vincent Laizé

Abstract

Vitamin K (VK) acts as a cofactor driving the biological activation of VK-dependent proteins and conferring calcium-binding properties to them. As a result, VK is converted into VK epoxide, which must be recycled by VK epoxide reductases (Vkors) before it can be reused. Although VK has been shown to play a central role in fish development, particularly during skeletogenesis, pathways underlying VK actions are poorly understood, while good and reliable molecular markers for VK cycle/homeostasis are still lacking in fish. In the present work, expression of 2 zebrafish vkor genes was characterized along larval development and in adult tissues through qPCR analysis. Zebrafish cell line ZFB1 was used to evaluate in vitro regulation of vkors and other VK cycle-related genes during mineralization and upon 24 h exposure to 0.16 and 0.8 µM phylloquinone (VK1), 0.032 µM warfarin, or a combination of both molecules. Results showed that zebrafish vkors are differentially expressed during larval development, in adult tissues, and during cell differentiation/mineralization processes. Further, several VK cycle intermediates were differentially expressed in ZFB1 cells exposed to VK1 and/or warfarin. Present work provides data identifying different developmental stages and adult tissues where VK recycling is probably highly required, and shows how genes involved in VK cycle respond to VK nutritional status in skeletal cells. Expression of vkor genes can represent a reliable indicator to infer VK nutritional status in fish, while ZFB1 cells could represent a suitable in vitro tool to get insights into the mechanisms underlying VK action on fish bone.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 45%
Unspecified 3 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Linguistics 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2015.
All research outputs
#10,935,964
of 12,339,349 outputs
Outputs from Fish Physiology and Biochemistry
#256
of 427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,158
of 224,652 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fish Physiology and Biochemistry
#11
of 14 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 427 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.