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Links between media communication and local perceptions of climate change in an indigenous society

Overview of attention for article published in Climatic Change, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Links between media communication and local perceptions of climate change in an indigenous society
Published in
Climatic Change, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10584-015-1381-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, María Elena Méndez-López, Isabel Díaz-Reviriego, Marissa F. McBride, Aili Pyhälä, Antoni Rosell-Melé, Victoria Reyes-García

Abstract

Indigenous societies hold a great deal of ethnoclimatological knowledge that could potentially be of key importance for both climate change science and local adaptation; yet, we lack studies examining how such knowledge might be shaped by media communication. This study systematically investigates the interplay between local observations of climate change and the reception of media information amongst the Tsimane', an indigenous society of Bolivian Amazonia where the scientific discourse of anthropogenic climate change has barely reached. Specifically, we conducted a Randomized Evaluation with a sample of 424 household heads in 12 villages to test to what degree local accounts of climate change are influenced by externally influenced awareness. We randomly assigned villages to a treatment and control group, conducted workshops on climate change with villages in the treatment group, and evaluated the effects of information dissemination on individual climate change perceptions. Results of this work suggest that providing climate change information through participatory workshops does not noticeably influence individual perceptions of climate change. Such findings stress the challenges involved in translating between local and scientific framings of climate change, and gives cause for concern about how to integrate indigenous peoples and local knowledge with global climate change policy debates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 2 2%
France 2 2%
South Africa 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Unknown 102 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 22%
Student > Master 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Unspecified 11 10%
Other 24 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 23%
Social Sciences 22 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 20%
Unspecified 15 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 6%
Other 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,395,680
of 12,323,473 outputs
Outputs from Climatic Change
#1,296
of 4,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,645
of 248,764 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Climatic Change
#31
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,323,473 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,656 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,764 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.