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Maternal Smoking and Infant Feeding: Breastfeeding is Better and Safer

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal & Child Health Journal, January 2007
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
connotea
2 Connotea
Title
Maternal Smoking and Infant Feeding: Breastfeeding is Better and Safer
Published in
Maternal & Child Health Journal, January 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10995-006-0172-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jose G. Dorea

Abstract

The rise in smoking rates among young women has implications for children's health aggravated in lower social strata where infant morbidity and mortality rates are higher. The protection afforded by breastfeeding is beneficial to infants in rich and poor countries alike. Women (especially when young, uneducated, and unsupported) who are smokers constitute a risk group for abandoning breastfeeding; moreover, their bottle-fed newborns run a greater risk of morbidity and mortality. Bottle-feeding is attendant on maternal cigarette smoking. The advantages of breastfeeding over bottle-feeding are discussed with regard to systemic effects and the specific effects of cyanide (which can affect the iodine metabolism of infants) and nicotine derived from food and maternal smoking. Despite great strides in bans on smoking, public health policies should be designed to keep in perspective that breastfeeding is an effective tool to counterbalance the health disadvantages that under-privileged infants of smoking mothers face. This paper argues that infants born to smoking parents are better protected by breastfeeding than by formula feeding. Therefore, if public health policies cannot stop addicted mothers from smoking during pregnancy it is fundamental not to miss the chance of encouraging and supporting breastfeeding. The food and health inequalities of socially disadvantaged groups demand well crafted public-health policies to reduce the incidence of diseases and compress morbidity: these policies need to make it clear that breastfeeding is better and safer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Brazil 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Unspecified 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Other 21 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 26%
Unspecified 12 16%
Social Sciences 12 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Psychology 6 8%
Other 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2015.
All research outputs
#7,320,689
of 12,321,014 outputs
Outputs from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#785
of 1,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,660
of 226,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#26
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,321,014 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,313 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,557 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.