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Factors predicting clinically significant fatigue in women following treatment for primary breast cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, September 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Factors predicting clinically significant fatigue in women following treatment for primary breast cancer
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, September 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00520-010-0986-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lynn H. Gerber, Nicole Stout, Charles McGarvey, Peter Soballe, Ching-yi Shieh, Guoqing Diao, Barbara A. Springer, Lucinda A. Pfalzer

Abstract

Cancer-related fatigue is common, complex, and distressing. It affects 70-100% of patients receiving chemotherapy and a significant number who have completed their treatments. We assessed a number of variables in women newly diagnosed with primary breast cancer (BrCa) to determine whether biological and/or functional measures are likely to be associated with the development of clinically significant fatigue (CSF). Two hundred twenty-three women participated in a study designed to document the impact of the diagnosis and treatment of primary breast cancer on function. Forty-four had complete data on all variables of interest at the time of confirmed diagnosis but prior to treatment (baseline) and ≥ 9 months post-diagnosis. Objective measures and descriptive variables included history, physical examination, limb volume, hemoglobin, white blood cell count, and glucose. Patient-reported outcomes included a verbal numerical rating of fatigue (0-10, a score of ≥ 4 was CSF), five subscales of the SF-36, Physical Activity Survey, and Sleep Questionnaire. At baseline, the entire cohort (n = 223) and the subset (n = 44) were not significantly different for demographic, biological, and self-reported data, except for younger age (p = 0.03) and ER+ (p = 0.01). Forty-five percent had body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25, 52% were post-menopause, and 52% received modified radical mastectomy, 39% lumpectomy, 52% chemotherapy, 68% radiation, and 86% hormonal therapy. Number of patients with CSF increased from 1 at baseline to 11 at ≥ 9 months of follow-up. CSF at ≥ 9 months significantly correlated with BMI ≥ 25, abnormal white blood cell count, and increase in limb volume and inversely correlated with vigorous activity and physical function (p < 0.05). Fatigue increases significantly following the treatment of BrCa. Predictors of CSF include high BMI and WBC count, increase in limb volume, and low level of physical activity. These are remediable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 56 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 21%
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Other 16 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 21%
Unspecified 6 11%
Engineering 4 7%
Sports and Recreations 4 7%
Other 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2016.
All research outputs
#2,043,496
of 9,365,896 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#548
of 2,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,213
of 84,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#4
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,365,896 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 84,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.