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Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) host-plant variants: two host strains or two distinct species?

Overview of attention for article published in Genetica, February 2015
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2 tweeters

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63 Mendeley
Title
Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) host-plant variants: two host strains or two distinct species?
Published in
Genetica, February 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10709-015-9829-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pascaline Dumas, Fabrice Legeai, Claire Lemaitre, Erwan Scaon, Marion Orsucci, Karine Labadie, Sylvie Gimenez, Anne-Laure Clamens, Hélène Henri, Fabrice Vavre, Jean-Marc Aury, Philippe Fournier, Gael J. Kergoat, Emmanuelle d’Alençon

Abstract

The moth Spodoptera frugiperda is a well-known pest of crops throughout the Americas, which consists of two strains adapted to different host-plants: the first feeds preferentially on corn, cotton and sorghum whereas the second is more associated with rice and several pasture grasses. Though morphologically indistinguishable, they exhibit differences in their mating behavior, pheromone compositions, and show development variability according to the host-plant. Though the latter suggest that both strains are different species, this issue is still highly controversial because hybrids naturally occur in the wild, not to mention the discrepancies among published results concerning mating success between the two strains. In order to clarify the status of the two host-plant strains of S. frugiperda, we analyze features that possibly reflect the level of post-zygotic isolation: (1) first generation (F1) hybrid lethality and sterility; (2) patterns of meiotic segregation of hybrids in reciprocal second generation (F2), as compared to the meiosis of the two parental strains. We found a significant reduction of mating success in F1 in one direction of the cross and a high level of microsatellite markers showing transmission ratio distortion in the F2 progeny. Our results support the existence of post-zygotic reproductive isolation between the two laboratory strains and are in accordance with the marked level of genetic differentiation that was recovered between individuals of the two strains collected from the field. Altogether these results provide additional evidence in favor of a sibling species status for the two strains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 35%
Student > Master 11 17%
Unspecified 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 70%
Unspecified 13 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Environmental Science 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2015.
All research outputs
#9,460,656
of 12,342,529 outputs
Outputs from Genetica
#374
of 511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,837
of 227,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetica
#14
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,529 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 511 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.